General Dentistry

Tooth decay and other dental problems are less prevalent than ever before, thanks to improved awareness of proper home care, water fluoridation and effective preventative treatments. However, problems still do occur that require treatment.

Thankfully, technology and methods are constantly improving, offering more effective, less invasive methods to keep your smile healthy. Our patients need not put off treatment for fear of discomfort or inconvenience. The best way to minimize the severity of problems and the treatment required is to catch problems early with regular check-ups.

Crown Lengthening

Crown lengthening is a dental surgery to expose more of the tooth surface by reshaping the gum tissue.

There are several reasons your dentist may recommend crown lengthening. It may be performed to prepare for restoration of teeth that are broken or damaged below the gumline. If you have a crown that extends near the gumline, crown lengthening may be performed to increase the space between the crown and the gum tissue to prevent the crown from damaging the tissue. It is also performed for cosmetic reasons, to achieve a more balanced, appealing look if a patient’s smile is ‘gummy’.

Fixed Bridges

A fixed bridge is a dental restoration to that is fixed to surrounding teeth. The bridge fills (bridges) the gap left by the missing teeth, preventing the surrounding teeth from moving into the gap and becoming misaligned.

A fixed bridge is a less invasive treatment than a dental implant. In cases where the surrounding teeth are strong enough to support the bridge, it is an excellent solution to maintain alignment and create a beautiful smile. Your dentist can craft a bridge that perfectly matches the color of the surrounding teeth, shaped to enhance your smile even more than the teeth it replaces.

Root Canal

If the nerve within your tooth becomes infected, successful root canal treatment can keep you from losing the tooth while treating the infection before it causes health complications.

Properly performed, a root canal is no more uncomfortable than having a cavity filled, though the procedure is more complex. It is the removal of infected or dead pulp (the inner nerves and blood vessels) from inside the tooth, and the filling and sealing of the resulting space.

An infected (abscessed) tooth causes discomfort in the form of swelling and toothache. It can also cause severe health complications, because the bacteria from the infection can enter the bloodstream and travel to other parts of the body.

One way to treat the infection is to remove the tooth and disinfect the area. However, tooth loss creates a gap between surrounding teeth that often necessitates a dental implant or bridge. It is preferable to save the tooth if possible through root canal (endodontic) treatment.

The dentist begins by applying local anesthesia and isolating the area with a rubber dam. Then they drill an opening in the tooth to access the infected pulp, and remove it and clean the area with specialized tools. The dentist fills the root space with a filling material. Finally the dentist must seal the surface of the tooth with a crown to prevent further infection and restore the function and appearance of the tooth.

The root canal treatment is typically performed in one visit. A second visit may be required to complete the crown restoration.

Composite Fillings

When decay rots away enamel, the resulting space is called a cavity. Left untreated, the decay will eventually cause extensive damage to the tooth, and potentially cause the root to be infected. However, if the cavity is caught early, your dentist can treat it with a simple filling, typically in one appointment.

Your dentist will first apply a local anesthetic, then use a drill or laser to remove the decay. Then they will apply filling to prevent further decay, and to prevent the sensitive inner layers of the tooth from cold, heat or pressure. The filling is applied in layers and hardened with a special light. The final layers are shaped and polished to restore the tooth’s appearance and function.

Composite (plastic resin) is the modern filling material of choice in most cases. We consider it superior to the silver amalgam fillings commonly used in the past. Silver amalgam fillings contain small amounts of mercury, while composite fillings are completely free of mercury. Composite fillings are also less likely to result in sensitivity to heat or cold, since the material does not expand or contract as much as silver amalgam. And since the composite material closely matches the color of the tooth, fillings are nearly invisible.

Root Canal Therapy

If the nerve within your tooth becomes infected, successful root canal treatment can keep you from losing the tooth while treating the infection before it causes health complications.

Properly performed, a root canal is no more uncomfortable than having a cavity filled, though the procedure is more complex. It is the removal of infected or dead pulp (the inner nerves and blood vessels) from inside the tooth, and the filling and sealing of the resulting space.

An infected (abscessed) tooth causes discomfort in the form of swelling and toothache. It can also cause severe health complications, because the bacteria from the infection can enter the bloodstream and travel to other parts of the body.

One way to treat the infection is to remove the tooth and disinfect the area. However, tooth loss creates a gap between surrounding teeth that often necessitates a dental implant or bridge. It is preferable to save the tooth if possible through root canal (endodontic) treatment.

The dentist begins by applying local anesthesia and isolating the area with a rubber dam. Then they drill an opening in the tooth to access the infected pulp, and remove it and clean the area with specialized tools. The dentist fills the root space with a filling material. Finally the dentist must seal the surface of the tooth with a crown to prevent further infection and restore the function and appearance of the tooth.

The root canal treatment is typically performed in one visit. A second visit may be required to complete the crown restoration.

    Contact us today!

    Dr. Nazeem Kanani
    Dr.Susan Cipp
    Dr.Darrell Rea

    Monday - Friday :
    08:00am - 05:00pm
    Saturdays by appointment only

    Phone : (604) 736-8051
    Our Office address is:
    2705 West 4th Ave.
    Vancouver, BC V6K 1P9

    Directions

    Is Invisalign right for you?

    Is Invisalign right for you?